Chicken with Milk, Sage & Lemon (Jamie Oliver)

IMG_9409Jamie Oliver’s chicken cooked with milk, sage & lemon, seemed to be calling out to me. Whether it was in the form of a random review, or best 10 lists, finally I decided to try it. The simplicity of Jamie Oliver’s recipes always appeal to me, as he has an amazing knack for taking the best and freshest and creating dishes that become part of our everyday cooking. The reviews for this chicken are pretty constant; many people commenting that it is the “best chicken ever”. That’s a pretty good compliment. Well, I tend to agree. I’ve made it a few times now, and each time I get exactly the same results. The chicken cooked beautifully right through to the bone, with subtle flavours, and a very “more” quality. We are given the comfort of a beautifully roasted chicken, with melt in your mouth tenderness. Continue reading

A Very Basic Pancake Recipe

IMG_8829Pancakes are usually made when we have the time to linger over breakfast (a rarity on a farm), have houseguests, or if it just happens to be a rainy Saturday. We’ll make extra, to be enjoyed cold with a bit of jam, as a mid-afternoon treat. My pleasure in making these is the fact that they are so very basic. Eggs, milk, flour. They are never too thick, or gummy, just completely enjoyable. No leavening agent required, as the eggs do the work.

Next time you awake to a lazy, rainy morning, give them a try with a knob of butter and a drizzle of real maple syrup. Continue reading

Heidi Rolls

IMG_6616It’s raining, and I feel like making bread. I have to make 16 loaves for an event, but I’m not feeling like doing that right now. Because it is usually part of any catered meal, it seems that I never just make enough for us. There’s always a reason to make several batches.

With summer just around the corner (even though she’s been taunting us with her wiles for the past couple of months), I’m going to make some of these delightful little buns to put in the freezer to have ready to accompany an al fresco dinner on the porch, or beach.

They’re not huge, just big enough to enjoy with a salad and something grilled. They can be topped with different seeds, and are buttery & slightly sweet. This recipe makes 36 rolls, enough for several dinners for 4 or 6.  If you’re invited to a potluck, these are always appreciated!

I call them Heidi Rolls, after the soft, white rolls that Heidi brought to Peter’s blind grandmother when she returns from Frankfurt, in the Swiss children’s story Heidi. Continue reading

Dutch Baby

IMG_6567For a few summers when in my teens, I was fortunate to be taken along to the Okanagan for a few weeks to babysit.  Besides spending hours on the beach and boating, I soon took over the morning breakfast ritual.  Out behind their cabin was a wood oven with a ¾” sheet of steel for a cooking surface.  I would go out early, and get the fire going, until the steel was just the right temperature.  Previous summers lighting the woodstove on Thetis gave me the necessary skill set at the ripe old age of 14.

The first day I made French toast.  I’d been told that the children weren’t fond of it, but went ahead anyhow.  I love French toast, especially when sprinkled with sugar and drizzled with lemon.  I won the kids over the first go; they’d just never had it with a custardy center.  By the end of our second week there, the neighbours had started “dropping” by at breakfast, often with a loaf of bread or some eggs.  One morning I made breakfast for 20.  This was most probably my first catering gig.

Even though this is not a recipe for French toast, it is a recipe for an easy breakfast dish that tastes great with sugar and lemon!

The Dutch Baby is basically a huge popover.  You can use a small cast iron pan, enameled bake ware, or a plain cake pan, anything from 8-9” in diameter.   All you need is equal volumes of eggs, milk and flour, with a bit of butter.  When it comes out of the oven, its sides will have risen up well over the edge of the pan.  Simply invert it onto a plate and serve with a sprinkle of sugar and a drizzle of lemon ~ fresh fruit, a dollop of preserves or a bit of syrup work well, too.  Plan on sharing one between two, or one each for hungrier folks. Continue reading

Butternut Squash Spoon Bread

IMG_5541Spoon bread seems to be in every magazine right now, and I figured it was about time I found out just what it is!  Trolling online and through cookbooks, I found out just a couple of essentials.  Firstly, it is made with cornmeal, secondly it has eggs in it, and thirdly, no self respecting American southerner would ever whip the egg whites, folding them into the batter.

I finally found an old James Beard recipe from 1965 in one of my books.  I had seen pumpkin & sweet potato versions, so thought I could use up some leftover butternut squash.  When cooking it, the fragrance of the spices reminded me of bread pudding, and likewise, when eating it, the texture was very similar.   Savory with just a hint of sweetness, it’s definitely meant to be served as a side dish, much like a stuffing or dressing would be.  It’s easy to imagine it sopping up gravy.  This would be a welcome addition to the holiday feast for everybody, including anyone who is gluten intolerant.

Alongside the original Beard recipe, it was written that slices of it are to be enjoyed the following day for breakfast, after being fried in butter, and drizzled with honey or maple syrup. I didn’t fry it, but I did take a slice, warmed it up in the microwave for a bit, and then did enjoy it with maple syrup.  Amazingly good! Continue reading